Le Post de MCNEXT

Les articles des consultants de MCNEXT

Microsoft Ignite 2015 – The Social Intranet : Integrate Yammer into Your Microsoft SharePoint Experience – Jeudi 7 mai

The Social Intranet : Integrate Yammer into Your Microsoft SharePoint Experience
Code : BRK3201

Par Stéphane,
Pôle SharePoint MCNEXT

Niveau : 300
Présentateurs : Eric Overfield et Naomi Moneypenny

Présentation des possibilités d’intégration de Yammer aux intranets pour les rendre plus sociaux.

Lire la suite

Microsoft Ignite 2015 – Dealing With Application Lifecycle Management in Office 365 App Development – Jeudi 7 mai

Par Stéphane,
Pôle SharePoint MCNEXT

Dealing With Application Lifecycle Management in Office 365 App Development
Code : BRK4126

Niveau : 400
Cible : Développeurs
Présentateur : Chris O’Brien

Travail sur le processus de développements d’apps SharePoint ou Office 365. Approche pragmatique et beaucoup de bonnes idées, à voir à tout prix !

Lire la suite

Your first Windows web application

Since Windows 8, you could make native Windows applications using HTML and JavaScript. With Windows 8.1, this kind of application also include Windows Phone.

With Windows 10, this kind of application is now officialy called « Windows web applications » or « Windows web apps » and is part of the Universal app platform. It means you will be able to make Windows web apps for all Windows devices : phone, PC, tablet, Xbox, Hololens, etc.

But it’s not just about the name. Windows 8 was really strict about security in those apps, and has restrictions on referencing scripts outside of the applications sandbox, or using things like innerHTML to prevent script injection.Those restrictions prevent using some libraries, tools and workflow from a web developper perspective.

With the Windows web apps in Windows 10, the goal is to put you a lot more in control, and even allow some brand new kind of scenarios. Windows web apps use a security model based on the W3C standard « Content Security Policy », or CSP, to define the security for your application. It means you are in control of where your scripts or iframe code can resides. It also means that using most libraries, like AngularJS, should come without friction.

Another great improvement is that Windows web apps use the rendering and JavaScript engines of Microsoft Edge, and not Internet Explorer. It means that you could use all new HTML, CSS, and Javascript goodness coming from Edge like ECMAScript 6 features, @support, interaction media queries, … When new feature will come to Edge, you will also be able to use them in your applications (as the time of this writing ASM.js, css filter and more are in but with an experimental flag).

But that’s not all. The sandbox have been expanded to allow an application to run pages, iframes or webviews from outside your application. You could now make applications running partially, or entirely from web content.

Windows web hosted applications

This new capability is called hosted applications, because your app can be entirely or partially hosted in the web. Lets see together how you could make such applications. To run this, you will need Visual Studio 2015 and Windows 10.

First create a new Windows web application by clicking file / new / project. In the templates, expand JavaScript / Windows / Windows Universal and pick the « Blank App (Windows Universal) » template.

new project

To use hosted content, we must allow the http domains we want to access within our app. We must declare those domains in the manifest of our application.

In Visual Studio, open your « package.appxmanifest » file. Within your manifest, you should have something like this.

<Applications>
    <Application Id="App" StartPage="default.html">
        <uap:VisualElements
            DisplayName="App1"
            Description="App1"
            BackgroundColor="#464646"
            Square150x150Logo="images\Logo.png"
            Square44x44Logo="images\SmallLogo.png">
            <uap:SplashScreen Image="images\splashscreen.png" />
        </uap:VisualElements>
    </Application>
</Applications>

Inside the application, just after the « uap:VisualElements » node, add a node called « uap:ApplicationContentUriRules ». If you start typing, you will see that Visual Studio provide intellisense. In that node, add a « uap:Rule ». To that rule, the « Match » attribute indicate the http domain, and the « Type » attribute indicate if you want to include or exclude the http domain.

You should have something like this

<Application Id="App" StartPage="default.html">
    <uap:VisualElements>
    ...
    </uap:VisualElements>
    
    <uap:ApplicationContentUriRules>
        <uap:Rule Match="http://www.mcnext.com" Type="include" />
    </uap:ApplicationContentUriRules>
</Application>

Lets make a full hosted app. For that, we will change our starting page to point to our http domain. Change the « StartPage » attribute on the Application node to reflect that change.

<Application Id="App" StartPage="http://www.mcnext.com">
    <uap:VisualElements>
    ...
    </uap:VisualElements>
    
    <uap:ApplicationContentUriRules>
        <uap:Rule Match="http://www.mcnext.com" Type="include" />
    </uap:ApplicationContentUriRules>
</Application>

Now just run your application by hitting F5. A brand new application will run with your web content.

As configured here our web site can not use Windows Runtime API (WinRT). To enable this kind of scenarios, you must explicitely enable this http domain to access WinRT. Update the « uap:Rule » you set with the WindowsRuntimeAccess attribute to « all ».

<Application Id="App" StartPage="http://www.mcnext.com">
    <uap:VisualElements>
    ...
    </uap:VisualElements>
    
    <uap:ApplicationContentUriRules>
        <uap:Rule Match="http://www.mcnext.com" Type="include" WindowsRuntimeAccess="all"/>
    </uap:ApplicationContentUriRules>
</Application>

Congratulations, your website can now access WinRT features like Cortana, native share, and all other APIs available in WinRT (just look at MSDN documentation to see them all). Your application can also be deployed in the Windows Store, and add visibility to your site and services.

Obviously, just wrapping a website like we did is not the most valuable story. You will probably want to add a few files to bootstrap your application and show a decent (and branded) error page in case the user access your application without network. You may also mix packaged and hosted content by opening an iframe on that same uri, or whatever scenario respond to your needs.

This new hosted applications and new security model is really interesting because it unlocks many scenarios, for both public store applications, and line of business applications. We will try to expand on such scenarios in future posts.

Microsoft Ignite 2015 – Du lundi 4 mai au Mercredi 6 mai par Stéphane

Par Stéphane,
Pôle SharePoint MCNEXT

LUNDI 4 MAI 2015
1 – DevOps as a strategy for business agility
2 – Deep Div into Safe Sharepoint Branding in Office 365 Using Repeatable Patterns and Practices
3 – Building solutions with Office 365

MARDI 5 MAI 2015
4 – Get Your Hands Dirty with the Office 365 APIs, Authentication, and SDKs
5 – Designing and Applying Information Architecture for Microsoft SharePoint and Office 365
6 – Building business apps like they do in the valley with Angular, Node.js, and more..

MERCREDI 6 MAI 2015
7 – Understanding the IT Pro’s dynamic operations role within DevOps
8 – What’s new for build automation in Team Foundation Server and Visual Studio Online
9 – Bose Turns Up the Volume with Microsoft Office 365
10 – Visual Studio 2015 for Web Developers
11 – Implementing Next Generation SharePoint Hybrid Search with the Cloud Search Service Application

Lire la suite

Microsoft Ignite 2015 – Keynote

Notes prises par Adrien et Stéphane,
Pôle SharePoint MCNEXT

« Mobile first, Cloud first » 

Mots clés de la Keynote :
Cloud
Windows 10
Edge (nom de code Spartan)
Sécurité
Mobile
Lire la suite

Les nouveaux outils Web dans Visual studio 2015

Microsoft s’adapte et on aime ça !

Une des grandes nouveautés de Visual studio 2015 c’est Lire la suite

Build 2015 – Day 3

Par Benoît,
Pôle .Net MCNEXT

Bonjour à tous,

Dernier jour de Build et donc derniers comptes rendus.
Première session autour des API d’Office 365 appelées depuis une application mobile.
Viens ensuite la conversion d’une application 8.x vers une application universelle Windows 10.
Un retour sur les nouveaux outils de VS2015 (Blend,  Profiling Tools,…) et enfin une session Xamarin avec notamment les outils Xamarin Inspector et Xamarin Test Cloud.

Benoît

Lire la suite

Webview dans Windows 10, quoi de neuf ?

Lors de la Build 2015 nous avons eu connaissance de plusieurs améliorations disponible dans le composant webview. Voici la liste: Lire la suite

Build 2015 – Day 2

Par Benoît,
Pôle .Net MCNEXT

Bonjour à tous,

Suite de la Build avec la deuxième journée.
Cette fois-ci direction la nouvelle API Microsoft Ink avec la recherche de nouveaux scénarios de saisie au stylet et au doigt.
Le projet « Centennial » abordé lors de la première Keynote a eu sa session pour en aborder les contours.
Enfin, retour au code avec une session technique pour améliorer les performances en XAML.

Benoît

Lire la suite

Build 2015 – Day 1

Par Benoît,
Pôle .Net MCNEXT

Bonjour à tous,

Après la keynote qui nous a tant surpris de part les avancées technologiques de Microsoft (HoloLens,…) que ses choix stratégiques (Android et iOS au sein du store), les sessions ont débuté.

Aussi vous trouverez ci-joint un compte rendu pour chacune des 4 sessions auxquelles j’ai pu participer en cette première journée. J’ai suivi un parcours plutôt orienté XAML, mais au-delà la techno, ces sessions ont été une manière de voir les orientations fonctionnelles et design pour W10.

1 – Strategies for developing cross-platform applications with VS 2015
Une session traitant du développement multiplateforme grâce à Xamarin et Cordova.

2 – What’s new in XAML for Universal Windows Apps
Un point sur les nouveautés XAML introduit par W10, entre contrôles universels, nouveau binding et layout responsive.

3 – Data Binding : Boost your app’s performance through new advancement to XAML Data Binding
Introduit lors de la précédente session, le nouveau binding compilé est ici étudié en profondeur.

4 –  UX Patterns and Responsive Techniques for Universal Windows Apps
Cette ultime session de la journée fait le point sur les bonnes pratiques du design d’Universal App (qui reprend nombre de guidelines Windows 8).

Bonne lecture ! Benoit

Lire la suite

Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Rejoignez 37 autres abonnés